Research

Proven Measures and Hidden Gems for Improving Gender Diversity | BCG

[Research Series] "The data is stark: among the CEOs of the 2015 S&P 1500, there were more men named John than there were women."

[From bcg.com] “Over the past several decades, US companies have made major investments aimed at improving gender diversity in the workforce. By some measures, those investments have paid off. Forty years ago, just half of US women aged 25 to 54 participated in the workforce. By 2014, that number had increased to 75%, according to the Council of Economic Advisers. Yet for the vast majority of these women, middle management remains the end of the road.”

The data is stark: among the CEOs of the 2015 S&P 1500, there were more men named John than there were women.

“The data is stark: among the CEOs of the 2015 S&P 1500, there were more men named John than there were women. Catalyst, a nonprofit that tracks inclusion in the workforce, found that women currently fill just 19.9% of board seats of companies on the Fortune 500 and a mere 5.8% of CEO spots of companies in the S&P 500. (See Exhibit 1.) Among executive boards, over the past four years, the US has seen only 2% growth in the number of women, compared with 11% growth in Western Europe, according to Egon Zehnder, an executive search firm.”


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